Wednesday, November 21, 2012

taming unruly fabric - The Coat

This lofty wool novelty fabric certainly considered annoying me, but I wanted a coat from it, so I didn't put up with any nonsense. For starters, I kept those pattern pieces handy so I could compare and re-calibrate often. In the first photo, I have laid the interlining on top of the pattern piece and made sure it still fit perfectly. Then I laid the herringbone on top of that, and made sure each edge was aligned perfectly and the grain was straight.

Even pinning was more handling than I wanted to inflict on this fabric, so I carefully serged the edges of the interlining to the wool. Testing first on scraps helped determine the correct setting on the serger.


During the quilting process, the fabric really wanted to stretch out shape, so I used my hands to cover and clamp down tightly on the fabric as it fed through the machine. The IDT on the Pfaff works like a walking foot, which was helpful in keeping the layers aligned.


I added a few horizontal seams in addition to the vertical channels sew into the pieces.


And one small portion of the collar wanted to misbehave terribly, so I exerted my will and quilted that down into place. No more bubbly parts!


19 comments:

  1. this is so great to see this in action!! my boucle is still in the bag, this may help me pull it out and beat it into submission....

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  2. Now I see why you quilted it. I didn't realize how unstable the fabric was - it looks like it's more stable than that. This pattern is unlined. Are you lining it?

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  3. Such courage and conviction. It's going to be fab.u.lous.

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  4. Looks great. Thanks for all the great tips. Can't wait to see it!

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  5. Thanks for the tips on handling this type of unstable fabric. It is looking great.

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  6. I don't want to ask a long answer question. But, I did none of this when I made my last coat. Is it that I used a fusible interfacing and you are not? I hope that answer is, 'If you read my posts more carefully, you'd see....'

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    1. ha ha ... well, the short answer is that fusing didn't work. The fabric wasn't smooth enough to get good adhesion. It also has these little glittery threads that melt if the iron is too hot.

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  7. Another re-calibrator! Hope you didn't learn this the hard way like I did. Now I do it with pretty much every piece. I am always amazed at how much edges can stretch despite taking all sorts of precautions.

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    1. Bunny, I caught on after a few wadders, so yes I think I learned it the hard way, too!

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  8. I love your "in process" posts. Are you quilting it to an interlining only? Or is there some quilt batting sandwiched in between?

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    1. It's just the fabric and the interlining, nothing sandwiched in between. The lining will be the final layer.

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  9. I love the triumph of determination and good humor--works for so many things, doesn't it? Elle

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  10. Robin, thank you for sharing your process. I incorporate that re calibrating technique with all of my sewing projects. I am always trying to develop best-practice habits, so no matter how simple the project is, I am (hopefully) training my brain -- and that will help when I'm working on more complicated things. Again, thanks, Robin. Looking forward to the next installment.

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  11. Stupid question, but does the quilting show on the outside?

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    1. No that isn't a stupid question! The stitching does not show on the outside because I am sewing along the lines of the herringbone. That's why my horizontal lines are zig-zaggy - I am following the lines of the herringbone so the stitching won't sew. The fabric is pretty fluffy, too and the stitching gets buried quickly into the thicker yarns of the fabric.

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  12. Ooo, nice job, beating your unruly fabric into submission. I enjoyed reading your triumphant victory over the troublesome fabric! Looking forward to seeing how this turns out!

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