Wednesday, November 7, 2012

how about a warm coat?

As I posed for photographs in the Stella Coat, it was impossible to ignore the chilly breeze invading the open neckline. Cute coat, but I need something warm! Enter a quick mockup of the Grace Coat:


Now this coat is designed to be trimmed with binding all along the edges and it is unlined. But I see the perfect warm winter coat in this design. It is roomy enough to fit over bulky layers, long enough to keep my important parts warm and short enough to hop in and out of the car.


I suppose it's a little difficult to make out in the photos above, but I added seam allowances to the edges since I won't be trimming them with binding, added a hem and drafted lining pieces that will attach to the facings. Having just sewn up the Stella Coat made the adjustments pretty intuitive.


On the left, above, are the completed back, and fronts stacked on the table and ready for construction. On the right you can see my quilting journey to attach the underlining to the fabric. Yes, I thought I'd do some catch-stitching, but I lacked the discipline to sew logically and it took too long anyway. Once I discovered the right pressure settings on the presser foot, I was able to get seams quickly sewn on the machine and the quilting was complete. That IDT on the Pfaff is indispensible for keeping layers together.

What's with the curtain fabric for interlining, you ask? Fusing didn't work! All that spot-fusing for nothing! ha. There are two reasons: the fabric is too textured and the sparkly threads melt when heat is applied. Well, that's OK - I read sewing blogs, after all. I've seen a quilted jacket or two in my time. My first official quilted jacket isn't hard-core couture, but I am giving myself points anyway.

Here is the pattern:

How exciting, right? A cute, easy, warm coat that should sew up quickly. I can't wait to add this into my winter wardrobe.

Thank you for all the positive comments on the Stella Coat; you almost persuaded me to sew the darn thing anyway, but this will be more utilitarian. You know what else is good about a coat project?The process is easily broken down into sub-projects. It's nice to focus on one thing at a time, such as bound buttonholes. As I complete each chunk, there is a sense of accomplishment to push me ahead to the finish line.

More to come!

18 comments:

  1. It's a good coat for you. It's perfect for your fabric.

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  2. It's going to be a great coat. The styling is wonderful.

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  3. Oh yes, you look much happier in this coat, more swingy. This is gonna be a real winner. Awesome collar and great length. That whole quilting thing, I can't believe you do that. Your clothes must sing when they are done with all the care that goes into their making.

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  4. May that is not hard! you can customake a real Womens Double Breasted Leather Coat on http://www.cwmalls.com. all service are great!

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    1. Hey there spammer, you got through. Guess I need a better spam-reduction method. Rest assured, I am working on it.

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  5. Love the fabric you chose! I've looked at both those patterns - but I'm not anywhere near ready to tackle a coat :) Can't wait to see how yours turns out!

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  6. Definately looks much bette style for winter and it will look amazing in that gorgeous fabric.

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  7. You know I've been mulling a coat too. I am currently wearing a vintage coat with a fur collar that comes up high. It has convinced me that I can't have an open neck coat. I get too cold! And, your description of what the coat needs to be is exactly what I need for myself.

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  8. I like this one on you much better. Great choice!

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  9. Nice! Can't wait to see it. This looks liek it would be right up my alley. I'd of course want to make it in something waterproof-ish, seal the seams, line it in some sort of thinsulate or windproof fleece, and figure out how to put a hood on it, but other than than I'd make it just exactly like that. :)

    Love that little bit of sparkle in the fabric. It's going to look great.

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    1. Leigh, this is the PERFECT pattern for using a waterproof fabric, as they tend to sew better in straight lines. There are no very curved seams on this pattern. In fact I have a raincoating fabric, bought years ago that I will finally sew, now that i have the right pattern for it.
      As far as the hood, ha ha, you are on your own :)

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  10. When I was growing up in the south, I had one coat. I now have an entire wardrobe of coats. I want to be warm and yet stylish, so what's a girl to do? Easy, make lots of coats!!!!! I love your pattern. Great lines.

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  11. I am in awe as I read the description of your creative process and I love the photo on the right with your wind blown hair. This coat should provide many days of warmth as we prepare for the chilly days ahead.

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    1. ah, but you flatter me!! I always read your blog in awe of your creative styling. Bear in mind that when you see me wearing a hat, as I eventually will do, it will be because of you :)

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  12. This is excellent. I have both coat patterns and was trying to decide which to sew first. So nice that you are doing muslins for both of us! They look terrific.

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  13. Love it! I'm also working on the Grace coat as a winter coat. Tweeked the fit...I'm not overly tall, so had to scale things down a bit. I'm wondering how you are tackling the collar....I'm debating about interfacing....I want it to stand nicely when worn closed, but I also want it to sit nicely when the collar is down.

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  14. This coat has my favorite kind of collar. I cannot stand to feel ANY air on the back of my neck when it's cold.

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Thanks for visiting my blog and Happy Sewing, xo