Wednesday, April 18, 2012

a fluttery cover-up for summer

You may have noticed I seldom sew a muslin mockup.  Instead, I rely on the pattern adjustments made during the tissue-fitting stage and plow ahead.  I cut enough pieces to get started, and start sewing.  I consider the first garment a test and make adjustments to subsequent versions.
detail of French seam on sleeve
I tell you this, to explain how and why I got derailed from the original design of this BWOF 05-2008-128 overshirt.  
{*cough* ... sewing a muslin 
would have taught me 
just as much as I learned
 from this garment, 
but let's carry on, 
shall we?}

Working backwards - let's talk about the sleeves.  In place of the original design, I substituted a long straight sleeve that can be rolled up, so I sewed a French seam.  I want it to look nice with rolled up sleeves.

The fabric is so lightweight and sheer that the rolled sleeves stay in place without any little straps and buttons.
I used my basic (and much simpler sleeve) instead of altering the sleeve on this pattern. That's because this pattern turned out to be a one-time-event.   I needed to finish it, and move on.
Too bad I didn't use French seams throughout the whole garment.
Can you see the serged edge through the front of the fabric?
That's why I didn't do any top-stitching on the sleeveheads.
It would have only emphasized the serged finish.
 (I had to doctor the color on this photo to capture the effect).   
I am a little disappointed that I don't have this pattern worked out for repeat use, because it is so darn cute:
Burda World of Fashion 05-2008-128
But I do have a wearable garment, so it's not a total loss.

Now - to address the whole muslin concept - if I had sewn a muslin mockup, I could have worked through the issues and solved each one.  I could have gotten this pattern to work.  But the main difficulty was the shaping in the bust area.  I was able to fiddle with it and make it work, but I didn't really understand what I did enough to transfer it back to the paper pattern.  So that's that.

Next up: PUNT!
There's not much time left to finish my SWAP so I procured yards and yards of solid black and solid white knit fabrics.  I'll be churning out some TNT patterns in the time remaining.

And we all know it, right? - those basic garments will get worn to death.  But hey, then I can get back to sewing the fun colorful stuff, knowing I have plenty of basics in the bag.

You can never have too many basics.
I like to get dressed fast in the mornings.

More to come!!

25 comments:

  1. Robin,
    I loved it when you sair "I didn't really understand what I did enough to transfer it back to the paper pattern."
    That happens to me too; I love that a sewist I admire and respect runs into this problem too. Even if I make and mark a muslin, I get confused sometimes. For me, I think it's the domino effect: I made the first change, the a second change and a third, and the third seems to affect the first, etc. Confusing! I admire anyone who develops a TNT just for this reason.
    Good luck completing your SWAP.

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  2. That's "you said", not "sair!"

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  3. This is such a pretty cover up. I'm glad it turned out wearable despite the problems. Also - you always inspire me to sew more of those basics. Its necessary sewing and it needs to get done! now!

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  4. Beautiful fabric so glad it's wearable because you will wear this a lot.

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  5. I love the fabric! This looks super cute on the mannequin, and I hope you get some good wear out of it. I hear you on the muslin, though. I'm doing a muslin right now, and I'm mostly happy with the results. So much so that I wish I'd just gone straight to the fashion fabric, because I don't know if I'll have it in me to redo this top in the targeted fabric. :P But at the same time, this helped me work out some of the fit issues.

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    1. ha! That has happened to me so many times! And that's why I switched over to using nice fabric for my first try.
      But like you said, it can be a risk.

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  6. The tunic looks great, in spite of the "issues". As a slight aside, thanks to your early good reports of Bernina My Label software, I purchased it and love it. The princess line designs fit me perfectly, but they do come from the armscye - similar to your tunic - so I adapted a copy for the seam to come down from the shoulder as I find this seam much easier to sew and fit, especially when I want to adapt other pattern company designs (again taking my cue from your practice). ps I see Bernina is withdrawing BML at the end of this year - including their online style variations - thanks to Microsoft bringing out yet another OS. LauraUK

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    1. Thank you for telling me that BML will be withdrawn, so I can get all the downloads before it's too late. I have kept an older laptop running XP operating system - that laptop is dedicated to my BML software.
      And good for you to move that seam line! I need to do the same thing if I am ever to sew that particular pattern.

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  7. The fabric is so pretty, I'm glad you could wrestle the garment into wearability.
    I have an excellent skirt, well, two really, that I made first time by retrofitting and taking wild stabs and weird tucks, and second time by making all the adjustments on the pattern first, after a muslin. I guess all this will pay off if I ever make it again, but I was so sick of the dratted pattern tweaking I couldn't face it at the time.

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    1. kbenco, that is how I feel. I kept the pattern just in case I ever feel like trying again. I doubt if it will ever come back out of the envelope - too annoying!

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  8. I am with you and rarely do a muslin first, however I did for my Chanel jacket that I am currently making. I think we are all hard on ourselves, worrying that you can see the serged seams - RTW manufacturers wouldn't even worry about it.

    Nice looking shirt.

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  9. The print pattern is beautiful. Looking forward to you in it!

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  10. Very pretty blouse! In general, my sewing time is too limited to spend it on muslins. I'd rather the occasional wadder than halve my production. I'm developing a pattern for the RTW contest and the endless muslins are killing me!

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  11. oh jeez thanks for the reminder. There is no way I can finish my entry in the RTW contest either. boo! But yeah, I agree - my sewing time is too limited to spend on muslins.
    It's one thing to sew up just part of the garment (like on me, just muslin the upper bodice) but another thing entirely to sew a complete muslin.

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  12. First, Robin - I love your colorful summer cover-up. Second, like you I follow a similar method for fitting the first garment. Sometimes I experience the same problem with trying to remember every small change made to transfer them to the pattern. Those little tweaks here and there get lose in the fitting process. But aside from all of the fit adjustments, you've designed/sewn a beautiful cover-up.

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    1. ooooh, thanks for the validation, Cennetta! You are so productive. I am truly amazed at how many garments you sew, so I guess this fitting method really does save time.

      Naturally, every situation is different and a full muslin mockup will NEVER be a complete waste of time.

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  13. What a beautiful piece! I can only imagine how light, summery, and uplifting it will feel when it's on.

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    1. gosh, thanks for visiting my blog Melanie! I really enjoy your creative outfits and photoshoots.

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  14. Cute coverup Robin! I like your choice of fabric---it's oh so colorful. I think it's cool you do alot of tissue fitting. It's great to have your custom form to help you with that. I don't blame you. I only reserve muslins for non-knit fitted clothes. Otherwise tissue fitting "fits" the bill!!!

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  15. Really nice fabric! I love the pattern!
    Beth

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  16. Fabulous work. I'm not really a bit florals person, but I like this a lot.

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  17. That's a pretty overshirt. I call that style a "big shirt" and love them.

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    1. Gwen, exactly! The term "over shirt" felt a little off to me but I just kept using it, because it's in the rules for the Stitchers Guild SWAP. It's a Big Shirt.
      LOL.

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  18. Marie-ChristineMay 3, 2012 at 9:31 AM

    I think it still looks really good :-).
    But if you fiddled with the already-cut fabric to do an FBA, it's because you didn't do it right, with more length in the center front. Check out Debbie Cook's tutorials, easy but really good.

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  19. Exelent job


    http://masinski-kutak.blogspot.com

    welcome :)

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