Sunday, December 18, 2011

I wish I had a rack like that


If I had my druthers, I'd like to be a real clothes rack; an amazon with broad shoulders.  You knew that's what I meant, right?  If I had broad shoulders, I'd wear designs that take advantage of them.  While I am fantasizing, I am believing I'd have events requiring a silk organza dress from Dolce and Gabbana.

If I had a rack like that, I'd carry wear shoulder bags.  This would leave my hands free and it would be convenient.
Source: vogue.com via Edgar on Pinterest

I'd show off those shoulders in peek-a-boo outfits, as opposed to wearing falsies (i.e. shoulder pads).

I'd wear more belts because my wide shoulders would make my waist look smaller.
Source: style.com via Brannon on Pinterest

No?  Not going to happen?  No.  No matter how much time I spend with barbells, it will never happen.
That's OK!  Really.  I embrace my odd little shoulders.  I do, I really do.

And it's not like I am entering the Miss Universe Contest.  No one is judging me, at least not in the I-am-in-a-beauty-pageant kind of way.

via Vintagraph blog
Wishful thinking!!

I am not complaining, just goofing off.  My mom & dad were generous in passing on their genes, so I'd be a jerk to complain.  And - I didn't even know I had small shoulders until I got into hard-core sewing over the last few years.  It took a lot of trial and error to realize that we are not all built the same above the armpits.  I truly assumed that a shoulder-is-a-shoulder-is-a-shoulder.

What would you wish for?  I remember hearing a very beautiful woman tell me she had always thought her feet were too big.  I was shocked!  I could not see a single thing wrong with her feet and how they affected her overall appearance.  Do you have any little pet peeves about what God gave you? 
Do tell!

And if you want a free dress, enter to win here!





20 comments:

  1. What a fun post. Hmmm.., I wish for slightly wider hips. I'm a little top heavy.

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  2. I'd go for the shoulder thing, too.

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  3. Like you, I had no idea my shoulders were narrow until I started sewing. And I'd wish for a (shoulder) rack like those models too....

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  4. I have never yet met a woman who was completely happy with her figure. This is sad. What a horrid chart you show there.
    Although I have a not-at-all secret wish that I possessed long and elegant legs rather than an entirely functional but less decorative set, I am quite pleased to have square and wide shoulders, abnormal as they may be, as they are useful for hanging the shoulder bag, and avoiding shoulder pads. Comments about Rugby players that bruised my teenage vanity are now amusing.

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  5. Cennetta, does it help at all to know I am jealous of you?

    LauraH & JillyBe, yep, I get it.

    Karen, I am glad you appreciate your shoulders!!

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  6. Ugh, I hate my lack of waist definition. Even as an underweight teen I didn't have a defined waist, and I would've killed (not literally) for one. And I suppose I'm not a fan of my knobby knees--now that I'm fat they aren't as bad, but before.....

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  7. well CGCouture, you will always know your waistline is the way it's supposed to be. You were just born that way :)

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  8. Hmm, I've always... not exactly disliked my broad shoulders, but felt they were something that had to be managed, not flaunted. But then, I've never wanted to carry a shoulder bag (my mom always claimed her shoulders were uneven from years of carrying shoulder bags, which put me off them at an early age).

    I could go off about my own figure dissatisfactions, but perhaps it's more useful to just be amused at all the things we pick on ourselves about, many of which no one else will ever, ever notice. (Ok, here's mine: my ribcage flares out at the bottom, which is just odd, and my ankles are a little fat. And like CG I yearn for waist definition...)

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  9. I wish I had my pre-baby stomach which was flat back in those days. Aside from that I'm not unhappy with my body, it may not be stunning but it does what it was designed to do and my husband thinks it's shapely so what more do I need?

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  10. I am pretty happy with what my genetics have blessed me with but the saggy arms that have appeared in the past three years do get to me. I wish I had the ripped arms I used to six, seven years ago. I work out on them just as much but they keep developing wings. Forget the facelift, just suck out and tighten up those wings!

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  11. OK, Tanit-Isis, I am glad you said it first so you won't think I am being mean when I say, how do you live with it? Your flared ribcage must be so upsetting. (*snort*)

    Rachelle, I have memories of a pre-baby stomache, too.

    Bunny, what a relief to know there is something you don't like! Doesn't it seem that as soon as you accept your body, then it's time to deal with acceptance of an aging body. I also don't care about a facelift, but I have mild fantasies about liposuction ... private thoughts, of course, not to be shared.

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  12. All depends on the day as to what part of me I don't like - then I think that I really should be grateful that I have everything in place and working quite well, thank-you very much. What I don't like can mostly be camouflaged. Unfortunately I have yet to invent a way to camouflage my face!

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  13. Irene, yes I know the drill: replace negative thoughts with grateful thoughts. And it really works, though it takes discipline. I wouldn't toss out the face too quickly, though- that's the smile generator. You need it!!

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  14. At this point in my life I'm focusing on loving all of me as I'm just happy to be alive. Not always easy, but it is my goal.

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  15. Judith, you speak truth.
    And I know you do a lot of yoga which certainly nourishes body, mind and soul. I wish there was a convenient yoga studio near me. I currently rely on Netflix for yoga classes. Better than nothing!

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  16. I find myself smiling, nodding in agreement, and snorting with giggles through these comments.

    I think you are so right Robin, that as you get older and start to feel comfortable in your body, then you start to age and it changes on you. I've decided to "get ahead of the curve" so to speak and imagine myself at 80 shaking my head because my 40 year old self is whining about inconsequential little figure flaws!

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  17. Was always happy with my figure. Even now, in plumply rounded middle age, I don't mind how I look in clothes. I wish that I had better skin.

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  18. I love my figure. It might be somewhat hard to fit but I still think it looks good. My only worry are my ribs which are "open". I don't really know how to describe it but here goes: Normal lower ribs are build an almost flat plane. Mine on the other hand poke out in front like open barn doors. As long as I don't get too skinny it looks okay. But if I have a weight I feel comfortable with otherwise my ribs make me look somewhat anorexic :(

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  19. It is so reassuring (comforting!) to know that most of us are mostly OK with our bodies. I think that is an accomplishment.

    I find that physical activity enhances that feeling of self-love. Whether that is a result of endorphins, or a little extra fitness, or something more mysterious I will never know. Sometimes I think it is the joy of moving to music that does it for me and that's why I love Zumba so much.

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  20. OMG, your post was so coincidental for me because I was just wondering if my shoulders are sloping more as I get older. I just can't seem to hold a purse on my shoulders anymore and it is so annoying! I never noticed this in the past. Urgh!

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